Played 135 times

It’s so great when you find the song that fits your mood, I’ve been feeling this song all day. The Rolling Stones have really been growing on me the past few months, blues rock in general. In reality, though, this song describes how I’ve been feeling in the past months, because no matter how many friendship points I earn, I’ll never amount enough to redeem the grand prize.

metamercado:

“If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, infinite.” - William Blake

Today I was thinking about how Jim Morrison is probably one of the ultimate American front men.  Most of his songs are so out there and their subject matters are so controversial (even to this day) that it makes him seem separate from the contemporary society of his time.  How then, is it that this man channels the spirit of a nation through his voice?  All you need to do is take a look at his rugged good looks and charismatic personality; listen to his deep voice - tough, hard, yet filled with sorrows, thoughts, and needs.  I can picture him in a smoke-filled room, singing about his heartaches and exaggerated stories to the bartender, with a drink in his hand and his eyes on the pretty, innocent waitress across the room.  He embodies the dark, masculine, pensive, yet instinctual and contemptible side - the Freudian Id - of America.

metamercado:

If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, infinite.” - William Blake

Today I was thinking about how Jim Morrison is probably one of the ultimate American front men.  Most of his songs are so out there and their subject matters are so controversial (even to this day) that it makes him seem separate from the contemporary society of his time.  How then, is it that this man channels the spirit of a nation through his voice?  All you need to do is take a look at his rugged good looks and charismatic personality; listen to his deep voice - tough, hard, yet filled with sorrows, thoughts, and needs.  I can picture him in a smoke-filled room, singing about his heartaches and exaggerated stories to the bartender, with a drink in his hand and his eyes on the pretty, innocent waitress across the room.  He embodies the dark, masculine, pensive, yet instinctual and contemptible side - the Freudian Id - of America.

Occurrences of the Week:

  • Mr. Bungle - well that was an experience.  If you’re familiar with jazz, metal, funk, and just strange music then you won’t be prepared to hear this album, but it’ll definitely help.  If you find music’s become too familiar, think again.
  • Whenever I hear one Vampire Weekend song, I want to hear EVERY Vampire Weekend song

Occurrences of the Week:

  • I finally listened to a full Tom Waits song, and I will have to agree with metamelero.tumblr.com, he is definitely one of the people you meet on the way to hell
  • I think I’m falling for Lana Del Rey
  • In the Aeroplanes Over the Sea is still as good as ever, and I promise I will write a review for that album soon
  • I am finding myself slowly adapting my tastes into country territory.  I mean, I’ve had Johnny Cash’s Live at Folsom for a while, but now it’s becoming one of my favorite albums.  This past weekend I listened to Bob Dylan’s Nashville Skyline and the Byrd’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo multiple times, and those are about as country as you can get without the cowboy hat.  What really did it is that I started listening to the George Strait that my old roommate gave me, and I have to confess that I can now sing along to “Ocean Front Property” and “All My Ex’s Live in Texas”.
  • Nine Inch Nails has become my go-to band whenever I need music blasting in my ears to relieve my frustration
  • Soul music is good for the soul - I was listening to some John Legend and Lauryn Hill.  It definitely hit the spot when I needed something organic, but was starting to get tired of country and blues

Two Lost Souls Swimming in a Fishbowl

Before I can even go on with my life, I have to reaffirm the declarations that Pink Floyd is one of the greatest bands to ever come together and David Gilmour is simply one of the best guitarists to ever pluck a string.  I just finished two days of listening to their four classics (DSotM, WYWH, Animals, The Wall) at least twice each, Meddle, Piper at the Gates, and some of their 80’s material.  Needless to say, I got my fix of paranoia, introspection, and spaced out landscapes for now.


Queen’s Night at the Opera

This album never lets me down and is undoubtedly one of my favorite albums and by far the best collection of songs Queen ever put out.  The thing about Queen is that for most of their career their strength was their singles; which on the flip side meant that their albums were not particularly their strong suit.  This became apparent to me starting on Jazz which includes some great songs, including my personal favorite “Don’t Stop Me Now”, but simply has too much filler.  But it wasn’t always this way; early on in their career, Queen specialized in concept albums of the progressive flair and actually struggled in releasing singles that would launch their sales.  Somewhere in between Queen II and Jazz, Queen achieved the perfect combination of good album performance and great single production, a rare eclipse of strengths that gave the world this album.
A Night at the Opera is incredibly fun and it’s filled with the type of songs you’d sing after stepping out of the shower or taking a stroll through the gardens in Buckingham Palace (not that I’ve ever been to London, but when I do…) Let’s put it this way, “Bohemian Rhapsody” is only one of the songs on this album, and that song alone is better than most albums out there.  I’m gonna stop writing about this album now, and you’re gonna stop reading, because if you have not heard this one already, you need to close every one your browser’s tabs and do so.  Yes, this album is better than porn.

Queen’s Night at the Opera

This album never lets me down and is undoubtedly one of my favorite albums and by far the best collection of songs Queen ever put out.  The thing about Queen is that for most of their career their strength was their singles; which on the flip side meant that their albums were not particularly their strong suit.  This became apparent to me starting on Jazz which includes some great songs, including my personal favorite “Don’t Stop Me Now”, but simply has too much filler.  But it wasn’t always this way; early on in their career, Queen specialized in concept albums of the progressive flair and actually struggled in releasing singles that would launch their sales.  Somewhere in between Queen II and Jazz, Queen achieved the perfect combination of good album performance and great single production, a rare eclipse of strengths that gave the world this album.

A Night at the Opera is incredibly fun and it’s filled with the type of songs you’d sing after stepping out of the shower or taking a stroll through the gardens in Buckingham Palace (not that I’ve ever been to London, but when I do…) Let’s put it this way, “Bohemian Rhapsody” is only one of the songs on this album, and that song alone is better than most albums out there.  I’m gonna stop writing about this album now, and you’re gonna stop reading, because if you have not heard this one already, you need to close every one your browser’s tabs and do so.  Yes, this album is better than porn.

Yesterday was Woody Guthrie’s 100th birthday.  This man was pivotal in the advancement of modern American folk music.  You might as well say that he was Bob Dylan’s adoptive musical father because Dylan picked up right where Guthrie left off.

Yesterday was Woody Guthrie’s 100th birthday.  This man was pivotal in the advancement of modern American folk music.  You might as well say that he was Bob Dylan’s adoptive musical father because Dylan picked up right where Guthrie left off.

This week, after a conversation with my friend Peter about blues, country, and American music, I decided to listen to some good ol’ Hank Williams kind of stuff.  Fifteen minutes later, I decided to go somewhere closer to home.  So for several days straight I’ve been listening to the roots rock movement of the late 60’s & early 70’s: the country-rock of the Byrd’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo (feat. Gram Parsons), the country-folk of Bob Dylan’s Nashville Skyline, the entire swamp rock catalog of Creedence Clearwater Revival, the early country-leaning years of the Eagles, the Beatle’s “back to the roots” Let It Be, some of the stuff by the Band, the Doors’ blues driven LA Woman and Morrison Hotel, and Led Zeppelin’s first four albums which chronicle a musical journey through American blues and later English & American folk to reinvent rock and roll.  For good measure I also threw in the White Stripes as a perspective on blues from the alternative era and I’m glad to say that I now understand why they’re so highly acclaimed and will agree that they’re easily one of the best bands of the 00’s.  I am currently continuing on with the Rolling Stones, but does anyone have any more suggestions in this vein?

This week, after a conversation with my friend Peter about blues, country, and American music, I decided to listen to some good ol’ Hank Williams kind of stuff.  Fifteen minutes later, I decided to go somewhere closer to home.  So for several days straight I’ve been listening to the roots rock movement of the late 60’s & early 70’s: the country-rock of the Byrd’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo (feat. Gram Parsons), the country-folk of Bob Dylan’s Nashville Skyline, the entire swamp rock catalog of Creedence Clearwater Revival, the early country-leaning years of the Eagles, the Beatle’s “back to the roots” Let It Be, some of the stuff by the Band, the Doors’ blues driven LA Woman and Morrison Hotel, and Led Zeppelin’s first four albums which chronicle a musical journey through American blues and later English & American folk to reinvent rock and roll.  For good measure I also threw in the White Stripes as a perspective on blues from the alternative era and I’m glad to say that I now understand why they’re so highly acclaimed and will agree that they’re easily one of the best bands of the 00’s.  I am currently continuing on with the Rolling Stones, but does anyone have any more suggestions in this vein?


Common, Be

The samples and production on this album are solid, and there’s no one better to thank than Kanye West.  Probably one of the best releases under his GOOD Music label, Common’s Be is a great example of the changing sound in hip hop in the mid-00’s, as attention shifted from the Dirty South to the cool Chi’ City.  The samples are mostly a collection of soul and jazz songs, giving the album a vibe akin to 70’s Marvin Gaye.
Lyrically, you could say that Common borrows plenty from Marvin Gaye as well - most of the songs in this one deal with social issues in urban communities and the personal challenges people face on a day to day basis.  Common is well known for this type of social commentary and he makes sure to deliver on Be.  The overall tone of the album is serious, but somewhat laid back.
In the end, this album is only decently memorable; it is not a groundbreaking album and frankly there’s only some sparks of originality.  It is definitely worth the listen, though.  It is a very coherent, flawlessly produced, intricately written collection that builds on Kanye’s musical prowess and Common’s lyrical depth.

Common, Be

The samples and production on this album are solid, and there’s no one better to thank than Kanye West.  Probably one of the best releases under his GOOD Music label, Common’s Be is a great example of the changing sound in hip hop in the mid-00’s, as attention shifted from the Dirty South to the cool Chi’ City.  The samples are mostly a collection of soul and jazz songs, giving the album a vibe akin to 70’s Marvin Gaye.

Lyrically, you could say that Common borrows plenty from Marvin Gaye as well - most of the songs in this one deal with social issues in urban communities and the personal challenges people face on a day to day basis.  Common is well known for this type of social commentary and he makes sure to deliver on Be.  The overall tone of the album is serious, but somewhat laid back.

In the end, this album is only decently memorable; it is not a groundbreaking album and frankly there’s only some sparks of originality.  It is definitely worth the listen, though.  It is a very coherent, flawlessly produced, intricately written collection that builds on Kanye’s musical prowess and Common’s lyrical depth.